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Sectarian Shootings

 

Jewish : Tree of Life synagogue shooting

 

 

 

Wikipedia : Pittsburgh synagogue shooting

 

The Pittsburgh synagogue shooting was a mass shooting that occurred at the Tree of Life – Or L'Simcha Congregation[a] in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on October 27, 2018, while Shabbat morning services were being held.

 

Eleven people were killed and seven (including the perpetrator) were injured.

 

It was the deadliest attack on the Jewish community in the United States.[5][6]

 

The sole suspect, 46-year-old Robert Gregory Bowers,[7][8] was arrested and charged with 63 federal crimes, some of which are capital crimes.[9]

 

He has pleaded not guilty.[9]

 

He separately faces 36 charges in Pennsylvania state court.[7][10]

 

Using the online social network Gab,[11] Bowers had earlier posted anti-Semitic comments against HIAS (formerly, Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society)[12][13] in which Dor Hadash[14] and Tree of Life[15] were supporting participants.

 

Referring to Central American migrant caravans and immigrants, he posted on Gab shortly before the attack that "HIAS likes to bring invaders in that kill our people. I can't sit by and watch my people get slaughtered. Screw your optics, I'm going in."[16]

 

Some sources argued that the incident should be referred to as an act of domestic terrorism.

[3][17][18]

 

Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting
Part of Mass shootings in the United States, Antisemitism in the United States and Terrorism in the United States
Tree of Life – Or L'Simcha synagogue facade.jpg
People visit the memorials to victims of the mass shooting outside the Tree of Life synagogue on November 4, 2018
Location Tree of Life – Or L'Simcha Congregation,
5898 Wilkins Avenue,
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Coordinates 40°26′37″N 79°55′17″WCoordinates: 40°26′37″N 79°55′17″W
Date October 27, 2018
9:54–11:08 a.m. (EDT)
Target Tree of Life – Or L'Simcha Congregation
Attack type
Mass shooting
Weapons
Deaths 11
Injuries
7 (including the suspect)
Motive
Accused Robert Gregory Bowers
Charges
  • 63 federal criminal counts
  • 36 state criminal counts

 

 

 

 

Reported Shooting : Tree of Life synagogue : Reported perpetrator : Robert Bowers

 

Wikipedia : Suspect

 

Robert Gregory Bowers ( born September 4, 1972 ),[7][8][56]

 

a 46-year-old resident of Baldwin, Pennsylvania, was arrested as the suspected shooter.[57][58][59][60]

 

Bowers' parents divorced when he was about one year old.[61]

 

His father reportedly committed suicide at the age of 27,[62] when Bowers was about 6 years old.[62][61][63]

 

Bowers' mother remarried to a Florida man when Bowers was a toddler, and he lived with them in Florida until they separated a year after their marriage.[61]

 

Upon returning to Pennsylvania, Robert and his mother lived with his mother's parents in Whitehall.

 

His maternal grandparents took responsibility for raising him, because his mother suffered from health problems.[61]

 

Bowers attended Baldwin High School in the Baldwin-Whitehall School District from August 1986 to November 1989. He then dropped out of high school and worked as a trucker.[64][65]

 

Neighbors described Bowers as "a ghost" and said he rarely interacted with others.[57]

 

According to accounts by Bowers' coworkers of 20 years ago, and analysis of his recent social media posts, what started out as staunch conservatism transitioned into white nationalism; at one point Bowers was fascinated by radio host Jim Quinn but at a later point he became a follower of "aggressive online provocateurs of the right wing's fringe."[66]

 

He was heavily involved in websites such as Gab and promoted antisemitic conspiracy theories through social media sites.[67]

 

Gab has been described as "extremist friendly"[68] to neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and the alt-right.[68] Bowers' Gab profile was registered in January 2018 under the handle "onedingo", and the account's description was: "Jews are the children of Satan (John 8:44). The Lord Jesus Christ [has] come in the flesh."

 

The cover picture was a photo with the number 1488, which is used by neo-Nazis and white supremacists to evoke David Lane's "Fourteen Words" and the Nazi slogan Heil Hitler.

 

He published posts which supported the white genocide conspiracy theory such as one which said "Daily Reminder : Diversity means chasing down the last white person".[69]

 

Bowers also stated that supporters of the QAnon conspiracy theory were "deluded" and being tricked.[70][71][72]

 

He also re-posted content by other anti-Semitic, neo-Nazi, white nationalist/supremacist and Holocaust-denying users such as Patrick Little and /pol/, as well as reposting comments in support of the Southern California-based alt-right fight club Rise Above Movement (RAM) who were present at the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia and were later convicted and arrested by the FBI in October for violence against counter-protestors and the "Western chauvinist" Proud Boys (led by Gavin McInnes) who were arrested for violence against Antifa outside the Metropolitan Republican Club in New York City the same month.[73][74][75][76][77][78]

 

He also criticized President Donald Trump for being a "globalist, not a nationalist"[79] and for supposedly being controlled and surrounded by Jews.[80]

 

In another post, he wrote, "There is no #MAGA as long as there is a kike infestation."[60]

 

Other posts attacked African Americans with racial slurs and images related to lynching, and attacked women who have relationships with black men.[81] He also used his online accounts to post conspiracy theories regarding investor and philanthropist George Soros.[82]

 

Bowers also had links to the far-right and neo-Nazis in the United Kingdom according to security sources.[83]

 

A month before the attack, Bowers posted photos showing the results of his target practice, and a photo of his three handguns, calling them his "glock family".[76] In the post, he identified the .357 SIG handguns as Glock 31, Glock 32, and Glock 33.[75]

 

Bowers also worked with alt-right associated blogger and League of the South (another organization present at the Charlottesville riots) member Brad Griffin (aka Hunter Wallace) of Occidental Dissent on doxxing an unidentified left-wing blogger posting "that address is not the most current for him. I can get you the most recent outside of gab".[84]

 

In the weeks before the shooting, Bowers made anti-Semitic posts directed at the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society (HIAS)[12][13] who sponsored National Refugee Shabbat[85] of October 19–20, in which Dor Hadash[14] and Tree of Life[15] participated.

 

He claimed Jews were aiding members of Central American caravans moving towards the United States border and referred to members of those caravans as "invaders".[11] Shortly before the attack, in an apparent reference to immigrants to the United States, he posted on Gab that "HIAS likes to bring invaders in that kill our people.  I can't sit by and watch my people get slaughtered. Screw your optics, I'm going in."[16][86][60]

 

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, "the mention of 'optics' references a disagreement that has raged within the white nationalist movement since the Unite the Right rally in 2017 about how best to get their message across to the general public".[87]

 

After the shooting, Gab suspended Bowers' profile and pledged to cooperate with the criminal investigation.[70][78]

 

Shortly after the attack, PayPal, Stripe, Joyent, and Medium pulled their support for Gab, and GoDaddy, which the Gab domains were registered under, required Gab to relocate their domain name hosting to a different service in the wake of the shooting, effectively shutting Gab down in the short term.[88]

 

 

 

Reported Shooting : Tree of Life synagogue : Reported Victims :

 

Wikipedia : Victims

 

Eleven people were killed,[51][16][52] including three on the ground level and four in the synagogue's basement.[53]

 

Among the dead were two brothers (the Rosenthals) and a married couple (the Simons).[38][54]

 

At least six others were injured, including four Pittsburgh Police officers.[41]

 

Five people were transported to UPMC Presbyterian Hospital, four requiring surgery, while one was treated and released by the afternoon.

 

Another victim was transported to UPMC Mercy, while the suspected shooter was taken to Allegheny General Hospital.[55]

 

Those killed were:

 

  • Joyce Fienberg, 75
  • Richard Gottfried, 65
  • Rose Mallinger, 97
  • Jerry Rabinowitz, 66
  • Cecil Rosenthal, 59
  • David Rosenthal, 54
  • Bernice Simon, 84
  • Sylvan Simon, 86
  • Daniel Stein, 71
  • Melvin Wax, 88
  • Irving Younger, 69

Of the four injured officers, three were shot and one was injured by glass fragments.[36]

 

 

 

Reported Shooting : Tree of Life synagogue : Dedication Services

 

Wikipedia : Pittsburgh synagogue shooting

 

The Pittsburgh synagogue shooting was a mass shooting that occurred at the Tree of Life – Or L'Simcha Congregation[a] in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on October 27, 2018, while Shabbat morning services were being held.

 

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Wikipedia : Tree of Life – Or L'Simcha Congregation

 

Tree of Life – Or L'Simcha Congregation (Hebrew: עֵץ חַיִּים – אוֹר לְשִׂמְחָה)[1] is a Conservative Jewish synagogue in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

 

The congregation moved into its present synagogue building in 1953.

 

It merged with Congregation Or L'Simcha in 2010, bringing its membership to 530 families.

 

Originally founded as an Orthodox Jewish congregation in 1864, it gradually moved closer to Conservativism.

 

In 1886, it affiliated with the Jewish Theological Seminary Association (JTS), at the time an Orthodox institution, but which developed the Conservative ideology in the early 1900s.

 

Tree of Life joined with JTS offshoot United Synagogue of America about 1916, formally connecting to the nascent Conservative movement.

 

In 2018, the synagogue was the target of a mass shooting in which eleven people were killed and seven injured. It was the deadliest attack on the Jewish community in the United States.[2][3]

 

[...]

 

History

 

[...]

 

The synagogue opened in 1907 with sanctuary seating for 750.[6][12][a]

 

[...]

 

References

 

[12]  "Dedication of Tree of Life Synagogue" (PDF). Jewish Criterion. March 29, 1907. p. 1. Retrieved October 28, 2018.

 

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jewishhistoryhhc.org : Jewish Criterion : "Dedication of Tree of Life Synagogue" (PDF)

 

 

 

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Note :

 

The Jewish Criterion, on March 29, 1907 reported on the Dedication of the Pittsburgh, Tree of Life synagogue, taking place "last Sunday".

 

March 29, 1907 was a Thursday

 

"last Sunday" was, March 25, 1907

 

"Friday afternoon" was March 23, 1907

 

Summary :

 

Rabbi Coffee held 3 days of Dedication services for the Pittsburgh, Tree of Life synagogue, beginning on Friday, March 23, 1907 and ending on Sunday, March 25, 1907 :

 

Events :

 

Pittsburgh Tree of Life synagogue Dedication Day 1 of 3 on March 23, 1907

 

Pittsburgh Tree of Life synagogue Dedication Day 2 of 3 on March 24, 1907

 

Pittsburgh Tree of Life synagogue Dedication Day 3 of 3 on March 25, 1907